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USDA - NASS: Crop Progress - State Stories (2020-01-28)

USDA U.S. Department of Agriculture - January 28, 2020


Crop Progress - State Stories 

ISSN: 2470-9816

Released January 28, 2020, by the National Agricultural Statistics Service 
(NASS), Agricultural Statistics Board, United States Department of 
Agriculture (USDA).

ALABAMA:     January temperatures were on average 2 to 9 degrees warmer than 
historical values. Total rainfall for the month ranged from 1.2 inches in 
Bullock County to 11.7 inches in Tallapoosa County. According to the U.S. 
Drought Monitor, the state remained drought free throughout the month. Some 
parts of the state received excess rainfall, saturating cropland and pastures 
in some areas. Wheat and winter forages were in good condition. Some of the 
last remaining cotton fields were harvested. Cattle were in good condition; 
however, pastures were either wet and muddy or dormant in different parts of 
the state. Many producers were facing impending hay shortages due to drought 
conditions in the fall.
ALASKA:     DATA NOT AVAILABLE
ARIZONA:     This report for Arizona is for the entire month of January 2020. 
By the end of the month, 50 percent of barley has been planted and 47 percent 
has emerged, according to the Mountain Regional Field Office of the National 
Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA. Seventy percent of Durum wheat has 
been planted and 65 percent has emerged. Alfalfa conditions were rated mostly 
good to fair, depending on location last week with harvesting taking place on 
half of the alfalfa acreage across the State. For the entire State, pasture 
and range conditions were rated mostly fair. In the southeastern part of the 
State there are still a few fields of cotton that needed to be picked, due to 
rain conditions, and most ranchers are reporting tank water and some forage 
starting to grow.
ARKANSAS:     The month of January has been wet with average to above average 
temperatures. Agents were reporting mild winter temperatures with good soil 
moisture. Many livestock producers are in the middle of winter time feeding 
of cattle. They are battling with wet and muddy conditions as hay feeding 
continues. Winter wheat is being reported as good condition under mild winter 
temperatures. The State average rainfall was about 1.2 inches for the month 
of January with an average temperature of about 43 degrees. Overall, rainfall 
has been typical for this time of year in the State, but average temperatures 
are higher than normal.
CALIFORNIA:     Topsoil moisture 70% adequate, 30% surplus. Subsoil moisture 
10% short, 70% adequate, 20% surplus. Temperatures for the month averaged 
48.4 degrees, 1.1 degrees above normal. Statewide average precipitation was 
1.2 inches.
COLORADO:     This report for Colorado is for the entire month of January 
2020. Topsoil moisture 12% very short, 49% short, 34% adequate, 5% surplus. 
Subsoil moisture 8% very short, 26% short, 63% adequate, 3% surplus. Winter 
wheat condition 5% very poor, 19% poor, 23% fair, 50% good, 3% excellent. 
Livestock condition 3% poor, 19% fair, 68% good, 10% excellent. Pasture and 
range condition 8% very poor, 15% poor, 31% fair, 44% good, 2% excellent. 
Minimal moisture during the month of January resulted in diminished topsoil 
moisture supplies across the state. Eastern counties received almost no 
precipitation during January and western counties received isolated moisture 
and some significant snowfall at higher elevations. Reporters in northeastern 
counties noted dry conditions were a primary concern for crop and livestock 
producers. Warm and windy weather, detrimental to winter wheat, was reported. 
In southwestern counties, a reporter noted winter snowpack was good, but soil 
moisture supplies were still short and severe drought conditions persisted. 
In the San Luis Valley, dry conditions also persisted and minimal moisture 
was received. Livestock were reportedly in good condition and less snow cover 
allowed many producers to graze later. Lambing and kidding also began for a 
few producers. In southeastern counties, conditions were noted as extremely 
dry and moisture was needed. A reporter noted high winds severely damaged or 
blew out winter wheat stands in areas. Livestock were being heavily 
supplemented. Another county reporter noted some winter wheat had also been 
chiseled in response to lack of precipitation. As of January 23, 2020, 
snowpack in Colorado was 113 percent measured as percent of median snowfall.
DELAWARE:     The month of January has been marked by unseasonable 
temperature fluctuations and excessive precipitation, resulting in high water 
tables and saturated soils. There was occasional snowfall but no real 
accumulation. While some experienced hard rains and winds at times, others 
reported spells of unseasonably mild temperatures. Livestock producers are 
preparing for lambing, calving, and foaling for the season. Farmers will be 
monitoring fruit for damage caused by extreme cold temperature points reached 
in the last couple weeks. Overall, producers are readying their equipment for 
the next season and attending farm meetings for education credits.
FLORIDA:     January temperatures were on average 1 to 8 degrees warmer than 
historical values. Total rainfall for the month ranged from trace amounts in 
multiple locations to 7.3 inches in Escambia County. According to the U.S. 
Drought Monitor, less than 10 percent of the state had moderate drought 
conditions throughout the month. Pasture conditions remained mostly fair to 
good throughout the month. Pastures started to show normal signs of seasonal 
deterioration during the month but forage supplies remained adequate. Cattle 
condition remained mostly good. Unseasonably cool temperatures experienced in 
the beginning of the month helped improve cattle health and condition. 
Sugarcane harvest was ongoing throughout the month. Strawberry growers 
indicated higher than normal fungal disease pressure and were in need of 
drier, cooler weather. Vegetable land preparation and planting took place 
throughout the month. A wide range of vegetable crops came to market during 
the month including arugula, green beans, herbs, squash, sweet corn, 
tomatoes, and zucchini. A cold front during the last week of the month 
affected many vegetable crops in the southern part of the state. Strong winds 
associated with the front knocked off vegetable blossoms and eroded yield 
potential. Citrus grove operations were normal for this time of year. Cooler 
temperatures were beneficial to the citrus crop, helping to achieve cold 
hardiness for future cold snaps. Early orange harvest was in full swing at 
the beginning of the month. Fruit harvested for the fresh market included 
white and red grapefruit, early and midseason oranges, tangerines, and 
tangelos. Grove work included mowing before harvest, spraying, irrigation, 
and fertilization.
GEORGIA:     January temperatures were on average 3 to 9 degrees warmer than 
historical values. Total rainfall for the month ranged from 0.2 inches in 
multiple locations to 11.1 inches in Rabun County. According to the U.S. 
Drought Monitor, the state remained drought free throughout the month. Small 
grains for grain, cover crop, and pasture have been growing well throughout 
the month. Wet conditions have caused some late weed control issues in small 
grains. Pastures and hayfields were in fair to good condition. Hay supplies 
were short in many areas of the state due to drought conditions last fall. 
Livestock condition remained fair to good, but a little below normal due to 
animals being fed hay earlier than usual. Hay quantities were less than 
sufficient in many areas of the state and cattle producers were looking for 
additional winter grazing. Onions progressed well over the month. Consistent 
rains kept producers out of onion fields where they would normally be making 
fertilizer and fungicide applications. Vegetables planted in the fall were at 
or near harvest completion. Land preparation and plastic laying were being 
done to prepare for spring planted vegetables. Fruit and nut crops were in 
need of additional chill hours. Blueberry producers experienced a short 
freeze mid-month with minimal damage to plants reported. Field activities 
included harrowing, tilling, applying chemicals for pest management and soil 
fertility, burning hayfields, pruning, cotton stalk destruction, and laying 
beds for watermelons and vegetables.
HAWAII:     DATA NOT AVAILABLE
IDAHO:     The state of Idaho continued to have a mild winter. The statewide 
temperatures in Idaho for the month of January were well above average 
throughout most of the state. In northern Idaho, thawing temperatures created 
slush and mud throughout the lower elevations. There was still some snow on 
the ground in Boundary County; more than a foot in most places. Farther south 
in Latah and Nez Perce Counties, rainfall removed much of the snow cover from 
area cropland. In southwest Idaho, the mild weather provided good calving 
conditions. Good precipitation, mainly in the form of rain, fell at lower 
elevations. A mix of rain and snow fell in the mountains. A sufficient 
quantity of all types of hay was available. In south central Idaho, the last 
three weeks of January provided both snow and rain moisture. Mountain snow 
packs improved. With the mild temperatures and moisture, some producers were 
concerned with stripe rust on cereal grains. Producers planned to keep early 
scouting presence in the fields this crop year. In Camas County, snow was 
reported on the valley floor. Most producers wished for more. In southeastern 
Idaho, heavy snow and winter weather conditions impacted travel in and out of 
Teton County. Ranchers began feeding hay to livestock. In Bannock and 
Bingham Counties, lambing and calving progressed normally. In Clark and 
Fremont Counties, it was cold and stormy.
ILLINOIS:     For the week ending on January 26, 2020. Topsoil moisture 3% 
short, 57% adequate, 40% surplus. Subsoil moisture 3% short, 65% adequate, 
32% surplus. Winter wheat condition 3% very poor, 9% poor, 41% fair, 37% 
good, 10% excellent. Statewide, the average temperature in January was 31.5 
degrees, 6.8 degrees above normal. Precipitation averaged 4.28 inches, 2.67 
inches above normal.
INDIANA:     Topsoil moisture for the month of January was 1% very short, 1% 
short, 54% adequate, and 44% surplus. Subsoil moisture for the month was 1% 
very short, 2% short, 64% adequate, and 33% surplus. Winter wheat condition 
was rated 1% very poor, 5% poor, 33% fair, 48% good, and 13% excellent. 
Statewide temperatures averaged 34.3 degrees, 8.4 degrees above normal for 
the month of January. Statewide average precipitation was 4.59 inches, 
2.54 inches above normal. The New Year started off warm and relatively dry in 
Indiana. And while temperatures remained well above average for the remainder 
of the month, the dry start gave way to wet conditions over the following 
weeks. The above average precipitation pushed up soil moisture levels, 
hindering field activities and creating muddy feedlot conditions. Calving was 
underway, and hay quality and supply remained a concern in some areas. Other 
activities for the month included hauling grain to market, cleaning and 
repairing equipment, visiting FSA offices to enroll in ARC and PLC programs, 
preparing taxes, and planning for the 2020 season.
IOWA:     The month of January brought a variety of weather conditions 
throughout the State. Temperatures were fairly mild for most of the month, 
but fell below zero for a short period of time. Snow and ice continued to 
accumulate across the State shutting down most field work activities. There 
were a few comments of tillage and late harvesting taking place early in the 
month as field conditions allowed. Grain movement in Iowa also slowed down 
due to snow and ice making travel conditions difficult. Overall, livestock 
conditions were fairly normal, but large temperature fluctuations increased 
the chance of health issues. There were reports of calving and livestock 
producers using supplemental hay for feed while hay supplies remained 
adequate.
KANSAS:     For the month of January 2020, topsoil moisture supplies rated 
10% very short, 22% short, 54% adequate, and 14% surplus. Subsoil moisture 
supplies rated 9% very short, 23% short, 59% adequate, and 9% surplus. Winter 
wheat condition rated 8% very poor, 15% poor, 43% fair, 31% good, and 3% 
excellent.
KENTUCKY:     For the month of January, Kentucky saw well above normal 
temperatures and above normal precipitation. Rainfall was exceptional early 
in the month as Kentucky averaged over 1.5 inches on back to back weeks. 
Temperatures for the period averaged 41 degrees across the state which was 
8 degrees warmer than normal. Precipitation (liq. equ.) for the period 
totaled 4.22 inches statewide which was 1.05 inches above normal and 133% of 
normal. The mild, wet winter has effected livestock with reports of pneumonia 
and calf loss to internal parasites. Hay supplies continue to be short from 
early feeding last fall. For the month of January, hay supplies 8% very 
short, 35% short, 52% adequate, 5% surplus. Despite stressed pastureland, the 
condition of livestock was mostly good. Livestock conditions 1% very poor, 6% 
poor 24% fair, 60% good, 9% excellent. Winter wheat is starting to green up 
early and remains in mostly good condition. Condition of winter wheat 2% very 
poor, 2% poor, 25% fair, 62% good, 9% excellent. Tobacco continues to be 
stripped with some farmers experiencing delays due to labor shortages. 
Tobacco stripping 89% complete.
LOUISIANA:     The month of January has been wet and soils are saturated in 
many areas. Fieldwork has come to a halt with the consistent rainfall and it 
appears this is likely continue for several more weeks. Producers have been 
unable to fertilize due to the unstable field conditions and rain. Mild 
temperatures have resulted in early bloom for most plants for this time of 
the year. Winter forage feeding has been to minimum, except during the cold 
snaps. Overall, average temperatures for the State are higher than normal for 
this time of year with seasonably cool and damp weather.
MARYLAND:     The month of January has been marked by unseasonable 
temperature fluctuations and excessive precipitation, resulting in high water 
tables and saturated soils. There was occasional snowfall but no real 
accumulation. While some experienced hard rains and winds at times, others 
reported spells of unseasonably mild temperatures. Livestock producers are 
preparing for lambing, calving, and foaling for the season. Farmers will be 
monitoring fruit for damage caused by extreme cold temperature points reached 
in the last couple weeks. Overall, producers are readying their equipment for 
the next season and attending farm meetings for education credits.
MICHIGAN:     Topsoil moisture 0% very short, 0% short, 34% adequate and 66% 
surplus. Subsoil moisture 0% very short, 0% short, 37% adequate, and 63% 
surplus. Winter wheat condition rated 1% very poor, 17% poor, 42% fair, 33% 
good, and 7% excellent. Precipitation for the month of January to date 
averaged 2.85 inches throughout the State, 1.13 inches above normal. 
Temperature for the month of January to date averaged 26.8 degrees, 7.5 
degrees above normal. Temperatures were warmer than normal across the state 
during the first two weeks of the New Year before beginning to cool after 
mid-month. Average temperatures across the entire state ranged 6 to 9 degrees 
above normal during the week of January 1-7, and several daily high maximum 
temperature records were observed in the northern Lower Peninsula during the 
week of January 8-14. Conditions were very dry early in the month with only 
light precipitation except in lake-effect snowfall areas; however a 
slow-moving storm brought significant rainfall to the central and southern 
Lower Peninsula on January 11 and 12. A winter storm on January 17 and 18 
blanketed much of the state with 3-6 inches of snow. As that storm moved 
east, many areas along the lakeshore saw an additional 4-8 inches of 
lake-effect snow. Warmer temperatures followed by continued rain during the 
last week of the month helped to melt much of what snow cover existed, 
raising concerns for wheat producers, who have reported ponding and ice 
sheeting in fields that were planted late due to the overly wet conditions in 
the fall. Farmers are still trying to get the rest of the corn harvested, 
manure spread, and fall tillage completed, but the warmer than normal 
temperatures with abnormally wet soil moisture have slowed progress. In the 
western Lower Peninsula, the lack of extremely cold temperatures has meant 
very little winter damage in fruit crops, but raises potential for other pest 
and disease problems. In the southeast, mild weather has made it easier on 
livestock farms with feed and straw supplies holding up well so far, but 
there were reports of pastures torn up with hooves due to unfrozen ground, 
raising concerns for poor spring pasture conditions.
MINNESOTA:     January brought roughly average precipitation amounts and 
above normal temperatures for much of the state. Snow cover and mild 
temperatures led to reports of no frost or shallower than normal frost levels 
in the soil and hopes of less winter kill to cover crops and alfalfa. Corn is 
still standing that will likely not be harvested until spring. Limited manure 
hauling and fertilizer spreading was reported. Some livestock producers 
expressed concerns over livestock bedding as corn stalks could not be chopped 
before snow moved in. Some reports stated straw was being hauled in to meet 
these needs, while others decided more bedding was not needed because of the 
mild temperatures. Overall January livestock conditions have been mixed with 
some reporting icy conditions and large temperature swings stressed 
livestock, while others see the mild temperatures as favorable. Reports were 
received of early calving underway in some areas and sheep shearing and 
lambing in others.
MISSISSIPPI:     Conditions for the month of January have been very wet. 
There hasn't been much fieldwork going on at this time due to muddy 
conditions. Rains have hampered winter season forage growth and grazing. Most 
producers are feeding hay and trying to keep from rutting fields due to 
excessive moisture. The state average rainfall was about 7.8 inches for the 
month of January with an average temperature of about 39 degrees. Overall, 
average temperatures for the state have been slightly below normal for this 
time of year, and average rainfall has been greater than normal for January.
MISSOURI:     For the week ending January 26, 2020. Topsoil moisture 55% 
adequate, 45% surplus. Subsoil moisture 1% short, 79% adequate, 20% surplus. 
Winter wheat condition 5% poor, 56% fair, 34% good, 5% excellent. Conditions 
overall for the month were warmer and wetter than normal with the state 
averaging 4.50 inches of precipitation for the month, 2.95 inches above 
average. Temperatures for the month averaged 34.0 degrees for the state, 
5.4 degrees above normal.
MONTANA:     This report for Montana is for the entire month of January 2020. 
Topsoil moisture 1% very short, 5% short, 81% adequate, 13% surplus. Subsoil 
moisture 1% very short, 8% short, 79% adequate, 12% surplus. Winter wheat - 
condition 5% poor, 24% fair, 40% good, 31% excellent. Winter wheat - wind 
damage 82% none, 13% light, 4% moderate, 1% heavy. Winter wheat - freeze and 
drought damage 78% none, 17% light, 4% moderate, 1% heavy. Winter wheat - 
protectiveness of snow cover 33% very poor, 26% poor, 22% fair, 17% good, 2% 
excellent. Pasture and range - condition 3% very poor, 12% poor, 40% fair, 
40% good, 5% excellent. Livestock grazing accessibility - 67% open, 19% 
difficult, 14% closed. Livestock receiving supplemental feed - cattle and 
calves 96% fed. Livestock receiving supplemental feed - sheep and lambs 96% 
fed. The month of January produced mild winter conditions with above average 
temperatures across the state of Montana, according to the Mountain Regional 
Field Office of the National Agricultural Statistics Service, USDA. Reporters 
in Prairie and Custer counties noted there is very little snow cover due to 
the unseasonably warm temperatures. Precipitation levels through January are 
below normal for most of the state, and areas in the western part of the 
state have only received about 70 percent of the normal precipitation amount.
NEBRASKA:     For the month of January 2020, topsoil moisture supplies rated 
3% very short, 11% short, 68% adequate, and 18% surplus. Subsoil moisture 
supplies rated 3% very short, 12% short, 71% adequate, and 14% surplus. 
Winter wheat condition rated 3% very poor, 7% poor, 31% fair, 54% good, and 
5% excellent.
NEVADA:     Topsoil moisture 10% very short, 15% short, 70% adequate, 
5% surplus. Subsoil moisture 10% short, 10% adequate, 80% surplus. 
Temperatures for the month averaged 35.7 degrees, 3.8 degrees above normal. 
Statewide average precipitation was 0.4 inches.
NEW ENGLAND:     New England weather had been relatively mild. Farmers were 
spreading manure into level fields that had no frost. Fall's late harvest 
caused some manure pits to be partially full going into winter. Fortunately 
December and early January's mild weather allowed manure to go out in some 
fields. Farmers were repairing equipment and buildings, planning for 2020 
growing season, ordering seeds and attending meetings. They were also 
finishing record keeping for the 2019 growing season. Winter kill was 
reported as minimal because of milder temperature. No major flooding had 
occurred and water pooling in the fields has been minimal. Reports indicated 
seeing a hit of some maple sap flow and preparation underway.
NEW JERSEY:     New Jersey is in the peak of the winter season with cold days 
and freezing nights. Animal health up and down with the weather. Preparing 
for lambing, calving, and foaling for the New Year. Vine pruning season in 
wine grapes.
NEW MEXICO:     This report for New Mexico is for the entire month of January 
2020. Topsoil moisture 32% very short, 33% short, 34% adequate, 1% surplus. 
Subsoil moisture 35% very short, 42% short, 23% adequate. Chile harvested 
100%. Pecans harvested 75%. Pecan condition 2% very poor, 15% poor, 18% fair, 
45% good, 20% excellent. Winter wheat condition 37% very poor, 50% poor, 
10% fair, 3% good. Cows calved 5%. Cattle receiving supplemental feed 75%, 
76% January. Cattle condition 4% very poor, 16% poor, 41% fair, 27% good, 
12% excellent. Ewes lambed 14%. Sheep receiving supplemental feed 67%, 77% 
January. Sheep and lambs condition 15% very poor, 8% poor, 25% fair, 
51% good, 1% excellent. Hay and roughage supplies were reported as 16% very 
short, 32% short, 51% adequate, 1% surplus, compared with 22% very short, 
35% short, 41% adequate, 2% surplus last month. Stock water supplies were 
reported as 18% very short, 36% short, 45% adequate, 1% surplus, compared 
with 24% very short, 29% short, 44% adequate, 3% surplus last month. Above 
average temperatures along with moderately dry conditions seen throughout the 
State deteriorated soil moisture conditions as well as crop conditions during 
the month of January. Notes from Northwest New Mexico stated that producers 
are feeding hay and supplements to livestock, stock water supplies are 
available but in limited quantity, and that unseasonable warm weather was 
experienced. In Northeast New Mexico, reports of windy and dry conditions 
have elevated the fire danger. They also stated that wheat was stressed from 
the lack of moisture. In Southeast New Mexico, the pecan crop was heavily 
affected by an October freeze. This resulted in pecans getting stuck in the 
shuck for the varieties of pecans that are harvested late in season reducing 
the quality and weight produced. The United States Drought Monitor released 
on January 23 noted that the State remained free of exceptional and extreme 
drought (D3 and D4). Severe drought (D2) covered 12.8 percent of the State, 
compared with 15.3 percent from the Drought Monitor for January 2. The area 
classified in moderate drought (D1) - currently 19.2 percent - showed an 
increase from January 2 at 13.1. Overall, conditions rated abnormally dry or 
worse were evident across 32.0 percent of the State, a 15.1 percentage point 
improvement when compared with the end of December. Drought free conditions 
were present across 29.3 percent of the State.
NEW YORK:     During the month of January, snow and cold temperatures 
appeared briefly only to disappear as warmer than average temperatures once 
again prevailed. Melting snow and thawing frost has created wet conditions 
where snow cover would be preferred this time of year.
NORTH CAROLINA:     For the week ending January 26, 2020; Topsoil moisture 4% 
short, 68% adequate, 28% surplus. Subsoil moisture 4% short, 78% adequate, 
18% surplus. Barley condition 3% poor, 25% fair, 68% good, 4% excellent. Hay 
and roughage supplies 3% very short, 24% short, 71% adequate, 2% surplus. 
Oats condition 1% very poor, 1% poor, 62% fair, 33% good, 3% excellent. 
Pasture and range condition 3% very poor, 16% poor, 57% fair, 22% good, 2% 
excellent. Winter wheat condition 5% poor, 22% fair, 66% good, 7% excellent. 
Throughout January weather has been warmer than normal temperatures and 
normal rainfall has winter grains slightly ahead of schedule. Winter wheat is 
average for this time of year. Field work has not generally started yet, 
other than application of fertilizer and soil amendments. The ground remains 
saturated. A lot of hay was put up last year, so hay is okay for now.
NORTH DAKOTA:     For the month of January 2020, topsoil moisture supplies 
rated 0% very short, 0% short, 56% adequate, 44% surplus. Subsoil moisture 
supplies rated 0% very short, 0% short, 56% adequate, 44% surplus. Winter 
wheat condition rated 1% very poor, 2% poor, 21% fair, 66% good, 10% 
excellent. Corn harvested 49%. Sunflowers harvested 67%. Cattle and calf 
conditions, 1% very poor, 3% poor, 16% fair, 72% good, 8% excellent. Cattle 
and calf death loss, 3% heavy, 74% average, 23% light. Calving progress 5%. 
Sheep and lamb conditions, 0% very poor, 2% poor, 17% fair, 72% good, 9% 
excellent. Sheep and lamb death loss, 3% heavy, 64% average, 33% light. 
Lambing progress 8%. Hay and roughage supplies, 4% very short, 20% short, 67% 
adequate, 9% surplus. Stock water supplies, 0% very short, 1% short, 82% 
adequate, 17% surplus.
OHIO:     Topsoil moisture for the month was 41% adequate, and 59% surplus. 
Subsoil moisture for the month was 1% short, 65% adequate, and 34% surplus. 
Winter wheat condition was rated 1% very poor, 3% poor, 18% fair, 66% good, 
and 12% excellent. The statewide average temperature was 35.1 degrees, 
8.5 degrees above normal. The warmest districts in the state were the central 
and southwest districts. Precipitation averaged 3.66 inches statewide, 
1.5 inches above normal for January, much of which was in the form of rain. 
Snowfall accumulation was down 5-10 inches across most of the state compared 
to historic averages. Fieldwork was very limited and pastures turned from 
dormant to mud due to warmer temperatures and increased precipitation. Winter 
wheat appeared to be faring well despite the lack of typical snow cover and 
increased precipitation. Minor flooding was occurring in fields near rivers 
and lakes and low lying areas.
OKLAHOMA:     For the month of January, rainfall totals averaged 2.67 inches 
throughout the state for the full month, with the Southeast district 
recording the highest precipitation at 5.09 inches and the Panhandle district 
recording the lowest at 0.45 of an inch. According to the January 21, US 
Drought Monitor Report, 9 percent of the state was in the moderate to 
exceptional drought categories, up 9 points from the previous year. 
Additionally, 2.5 percent of the state was in the severe to exceptional 
drought categories, up 2.5 points from the previous year. Statewide 
temperatures averaged in the low 40's, with the lowest recording of 5 degrees 
at Boise City on Saturday, January 11th and the highest recording of 
77 degrees at Hugo on Wednesday, January 15th. Topsoil and subsoil moisture 
conditions were rated mostly adequate to surplus.
OREGON:     The statewide temperatures in Oregon for the month of January 
remained near normal to above average throughout the State. Some major storm 
activity brought above-average moisture to a good portion of the State. In 
the northern coastal region of Oregon, Polk County crops such as grass and 
specialty seeds, small grains, and hazelnuts all experienced normal 
conditions this month. Pastures were not affected by mid-January cold 
weather. Some seasonal mild temperatures and rains allowed grasses to 
continue to grow this month. In Tillamook County, heavy rains saturated some 
fields. There was some standing water at times. Grass growth slowed but the 
fields still looked good. A few dairy animals were reported confined on 
pasture. Local rivers ran full during rain events but created minimal damage 
to adjacent fields. In northeastern Oregon, weather was warmer than normal. 
Mountains saw some snow. Valleys received some snow along with rain. Cattle 
were moved to calving grounds in Baker County. In Umatilla County, winter 
wheat progressed nicely. Stands looked good. Winter canola looked excellent. 
In southwestern Oregon, a very dry fall planting season for cover crops and 
small grains was replaced by a January with over five inches of rain. The 
steady rains were absorbed nicely without much ponding or runoff. The winter 
temperatures were mild with only a few short periods with night time lows 
going into the upper 20's. Producers were able to make very timely dormant 
sprays for tree fruit and berry crops before the rain arrived. In several 
parts of south central and southeastern Oregon, a very mild January was 
observed. Very little snow was on the low lands. The mountains received a 
good shot of snow which brought central Oregon snowpack levels to near 
normal. In Lake County, spring calving began. Temperatures in the upper 30's 
and low 40's were a welcome sight when compared to this time the previous 
year. Livestock mortality rates were reported much lower this January.
PENNSYLVANIA:     Mid-January brought some snow but has once again given way 
to more unseasonably warm temperatures. Resulting field conditions are wet 
and muddy due to snow melt. Some late standing soybeans were harvested but 
otherwise producers appear busy managing fields and equipment.
SOUTH CAROLINA:     January temperatures were on average 4 to 10 degrees 
warmer than historical values. Total rainfall for the month ranged from 
0.4 inches in Charleston County to 9.8 inches in Greenville County. According 
to the U.S. Drought Monitor, the state remained drought free throughout the 
month. Winter wheat and oats were looking good; however, excess rainfall 
prevented producers from applying nitrogen and lime. Producers were preparing 
fields for planting greens in February. Cattle condition was good, but 
pastures and winter grazing were in poor condition in some areas due to 
excess moisture.
SOUTH DAKOTA:     For the month of January 2020, topsoil moisture supplies 
rated 0% very short, 0% short, 52% adequate, 48% surplus. Subsoil moisture 
supplies rated 0% very short, 1% short, 56% adequate, 43% surplus. Corn 
harvested 96%. Winter wheat condition rated 0% very poor, 1% poor, 23% fair, 
73% good, and 3% excellent. Sunflowers harvested 96%.
TENNESSEE:     For the month of January, Topsoil moisture 42% adequate, 58% 
surplus. Subsoil moisture 52% adequate, 48% surplus. Winter wheat condition 
2% very poor, 7% poor 24% fair, 56% good, 11% excellent. Pasture and Range 
condition 6% very poor, 22% poor, 40% fair, 28% good, 4% excellent. Cattle 
condition 2% very poor, 9% poor, 28% fair, 50% good, 11% excellent. Hay and 
roughage supplies 5% very short, 28% short, 57% adequate, 10% surplus. 
Tennessee experienced above normal temperatures and rainfall. The weather 
conditions resulted in saturated and muddy soils. Winter wheat condition 
reported mostly good. Cattle condition is currently reported mostly good. Hay 
and roughage supplies are considered adequate for the coming winter months, 
though fears of shortages are rising.
TEXAS:     Precipitation mostly ranged from trace amounts to upwards of 
4 inches with isolated areas in East Texas and the Upper Coast receiving 
upwards of 8 inches. Cotton harvest virtually complete throughout the state. 
Small grains seeding was nearing completion, however, development was behind 
normal in some areas. Row crop producers in South Texas and Upper Coast 
prepared fields for planting. Livestock condition continued fair to good. 
Supplemental feeding continued statewide.
UTAH:     This report for Utah is for the entire month of January 2020. 
Topsoil moisture 14% short, 80% adequate, 6% surplus. Subsoil moisture 
12% short, 84% adequate, 4% surplus. Pasture and range condition 7% poor, 
39% fair, 54% good. Winter wheat condition 6% poor, 41% fair, 53% good. Hay 
and roughage supplies 6% short, 94% adequate. Stock water supplies 7% short, 
86% adequate, 7% surplus. Cattle and calves condition 11% fair, 87% good, 
2% excellent. Sheep and lambs condition 2% poor, 16% fair, 80% good, 
2% excellent. Livestock receiving supplemental feed for cattle 81%. Livestock 
receiving supplemental feed for sheep 71%. Cows calved 4%. Ewes lambed-farm 
flock 14%. Ewes lambed-range flock 1%. Mild temperature along with isolated 
snow storms occurred throughout the state for the month of January. Box Elder 
County reports producers are busy feeding cattle. Beaver County reports 
livestock are doing well, but it has been a mild winter with low snowpack. 
Iron County reports producers are hauling water due to a lack of snow.
VIRGINIA:     For the week ending January 26, 2020, Topsoil moisture 2% 
short, 81% adequate, 17% surplus. Subsoil moisture 3% short, 91% adequate, 6% 
surplus. Winter wheat condition 34% fair, 61% good, 5% excellent. Barley 
condition 43% fair, 56% good, 1% excellent. Livestock condition 1% very poor, 
5% poor, 36% fair, 53% good, 5% excellent. Pasture and Range condition 7% 
very poor, 31% poor, 42% fair, 18% good, 2% excellent. Hay and roughage 
supplies 12% very short, 38% short, 49% adequate, 1% surplus. Percent of feed 
obtained from pastures 8%. Virginia experienced above normal temperatures and 
precipitation in January. Small grain and pasture conditions have declined 
due to the wet conditions. Hay supplies are tight due to poor hay production 
in the fall. Hay and roughage supplies are mostly short to adequate. Primary 
activities for the month include equipment maintenance and purchasing seed 
and fertilizer.
WASHINGTON:     Western Washington precipitation was well above average in 
January. Repeated storms really helped the snowpack levels in both the 
Olympic and Cascade Mountain Ranges. Wet conditions and standing water were 
reported throughout western Washington. Some producers in western Washington 
were concerned that the colder temperatures and snow in mid-January may have 
affected fall planted crops. Unusually cold temperatures and lowland snow 
also concerned cranberry and blueberry growers. January weather conditions 
around Snohomish County created multiple flooding situations along 
Stillaguamish, Skokomish and Snoqualmie rivers. In San Juan County, water was 
flowing seasonally high due to saturated layers of soil. Small streams and 
the larger watersheds were filling fast. Many ponds were already full. 
Livestock farmers brought out the stock tank heaters and added a bit more 
feed to the daily rations. Farms with orchards pruned during lulls in the 
weather. In central Washington, the Okanogan Valley experienced cold 
temperatures, snow, and high winds the second week in January. Later in the 
month, warmer temperatures brought rain and melting snow. This caused some 
runoff and ponding. The crop-producing areas of Yakima County got a little 
over one inch of precipitation during eight rain and snow events in January. 
Throughout the month, the low temperature dropped into single digits only 
once on January 17. No crop damage was reported. In the northeast region, 
Stevens County received approximately 13 inches of snow. Fall planted crops 
did well. In east central Washington, Winter wheat condition was normal. It 
was too early to assess whether the cold temperatures in early January 
adversely affected any exposed wheat not protected by snow. In southeast 
Washington, the January weather was mostly favorable for farmers and ranchers 
in Whitman County. November was very dry, but December and January brought 
much needed moisture and mild temperatures. The winter wheat stands 
throughout the county looked good. The late seeded fields had emerged. Recent 
rains helped subsoil moisture replenishment. The rangeland conditions in 
Whitman County also looked good.
WEST VIRGINIA:     For the week ending January 26, Topsoil moisture 4% very 
short, 8% short, 79% adequate, and 9% surplus. Subsoil moisture 5% very 
short, 8% short, and 87% adequate. Hay and roughage supplies 3% very short, 
8% short, 83% adequate, and 6% surplus. Feed grain supplies 2% very short, 7% 
short, and 91% adequate. Winter wheat condition 9% poor, 40% fair, and 51% 
good. Cattle and calves condition 2% poor, 21% fair, 68% good, and 9% 
excellent. Sheep and lambs condition 1% poor, 8% fair, 87% good, and 4% 
excellent. Weather conditions for the month have been warmer with 
temperatures above normal with rain and some snow as temperatures fell. 
Farming activities for the month included winter hay and grain feeding, early 
calving and lambing, and planning for the new crop season.
WISCONSIN:     January temperatures at the five major weather stations were 
all above normal. They ranged from 9.6 degrees above normal in Green Bay to 
5.8 degrees above normal in Eau Claire. Average highs ranged from 
28.1 degrees in Eau Claire to 36.7 degrees in Milwaukee, while average lows 
ranged from 12.0 degrees in Eau Claire to 23.2 degrees in Milwaukee. 
Precipitation ranged from 0.97 inches in La Crosse to 2.07 inches in 
Milwaukee. Madison received the most snowfall out of the major cities with 
18.6 inches. La Crosse received the least, with 11.9 inches of snow for the 
month. Most areas of Wisconsin still had some corn standing at the beginning 
of January, and farmers harvested where snow and mud allowed. Farmers also 
continued with late tillage and manure application.
WYOMING:     This report for Wyoming is for the entire month of January 2020. 
Topsoil moisture 2% very short, 22% short, 76% adequate. Subsoil moisture 1% 
very short, 20% short, 79% adequate. Winter wheat condition 4% very poor, 7% 
poor, 27% fair, 58% good, 4% excellent. Sheep and lamb progress 1% ewes 
lambed. Hay and roughage supplies 8% short, 92% adequate. Livestock condition 
1% poor, 7% fair, 82% good, 10% excellent. Stock water supplies 1% very 
short, 13% short, 86% adequate. Pasture and range condition 2% very poor, 6% 
poor, 49% fair, 35% good, 8% excellent. Winter wheat condition is mostly good 
to fair and pasture and range is rated mostly good to fair. Temperatures were 
slightly above normal for most of the state and topsoil moisture levels have 
gotten dryer in the western half of the state from last month.

Statistical Methodology

Survey Procedures: Crop progress and condition estimates included in this 
report are based on survey data collected in December, January, February, and 
March. The non-probability crop progress and condition surveys include input 
from approximately 4,000 respondents whose occupations provide them 
opportunities to make visual observations and frequently bring them in 
contact with farmers in their counties. Based on standard definitions, these 
respondents subjectively estimate the progress of crops through various 
stages of development, as well as the progress of producer activities. They 
also provide subjective evaluations of crop and soil moisture conditions. Any 
weather data mentioned in this report is provided by outside sources such as 
the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Agricultural 
Weather Information Service (AWIS).

Information Contacts

Listed below are the commodity statisticians in the Crops Branch of the National Agricultural 
Statistics Service to contact for additional information. E-mail inquiries may be sent to 
nass@usda.gov

Lance Honig, Chief, Crops Branch................................................ (202) 720-2127

Travis Thorson, Head, Field Crops Section   (202) 720-7369
     David Colwell - Current Agricultural Industrial Reports   (202) 720-8800
     Chris Hawthorn - Corn, Flaxseed, Proso Millet   (202) 720-9526
     James Johanson - County Estimates, Hay   (202) 690-8533
     Jeff Lemmons - Oats, Soybeans   (202) 690-3234
     Irwin Anolik - Crop Weather   (202) 720-7621
     Travis Thorson - Peanuts, Rice............................................. (202) 720-7369
     Jean Porter - Rye, Wheat   (202) 720-8068
Chris Singh - Cotton, Cotton Ginnings, Sorghum   (202) 720-5944
     Travis Thorson - Barley, Sunflower, Other Oilseeds......................... (202) 720-7369

Access to NASS Reports

For your convenience, you may access NASS reports and products the following 
ways:

 	All reports are available electronically, at no cost, on the NASS web 
site: www.nass.usda.gov

 	Both national and state specific reports are available via a free e-
mail subscription. To set-up this free subscription, visit 
www.nass.usda.gov and click on "National" or "State" in upper right 
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 	Cornell's Mann Library has launched a new website housing NASS's and 
other agency's archived reports. The new website, 
https://usda.library.cornell.edu. All email subscriptions containing 
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For more information on NASS surveys and reports, call the NASS Agricultural 
Statistics Hotline at (800) 727-9540, 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. ET, or e-mail: 
nass@usda.gov. 
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its customers, employees, and applicants for employment on the basis of race, 
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reprisal, and where applicable, political beliefs, marital status, familial 
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If you wish to file a Civil Rights program complaint of discrimination, 
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Send your completed complaint form or letter to us by mail at U.S. Department 
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